HISTORICAL GROWTH OF THE HUMAN POPULATION

OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY --- BIOLOGY 301 --- HUMAN IMPACTS ON ECOSYSTEMS (2014)

HUMAN POPULATION GROWTH: HISTORY AND PARAMETERS

Copyright 1998, Patricia S. Muir

Notes on this topic follow. If you want to use the study guide covering the history of human population growth and basic population parameters, or to obtain additional references on this topic, click on study guide. Click on current status to look at notes on the current status of the human population (we'll get to that soon in lecture)

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TOPIC OUTLINE:

I. Is overpopulation a (or the?) fundamental cause of environmental degradation?

A. Garrett Hardin in "Tragedy of the Commons" answers "yes."

B. Barry Commoner answers that technology is the problem.

C. Julian Simon answers that we need more people, not fewer.

D. I = P * A * T

II. Quick look at current human population

III. Historical growth rate and population parameters

A. G = B - D

B. Historical factors affecting "D"

C. Per capita birth and death rates ("b" and "d")

D. Crude birth and death rates

E. b - d = r = "rate of natural increase"

F. G = (b - d) * N = r * N

G. r * 100 = % rate of increase

H. Influence of N on G

I. Exponential growth

IV. Sustainability questions

A. Cornucopian versus NeoMalthusian perspectives

V. Logistic growth

A. Carrying capacity ("K")

VI. Answers to "Check yourself questions"

Page maintained by Patricia Muir at Oregon State University; last updated Nov. 5, 2013.
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