Oregon State University

CS 101: Applications and Implications of Computers

Oregon State University, College of Engineering

Chapter 6 ~ Wellness and Making
Computing Changes

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Computing is changing how our brains work and may improve our intellect, sociability, and emotional regulation. But what are the physical costs as well as emotional costs? In this chapter, you'll read about the consequences of computing and learn how you can relieve eye and neck/arm strain. You'll then record an assessment of your use of computer technologies.

It's my support group for Zoom Fatigue Syndrome.

Group Discussion

Start a new word processing document or Keep note and write about the reading and research below. Write in complete sentences. Hyperlink the titles of articles in your writing so your groupmates can quickly jump to them. Check spelling and grammar. After posting your finished writing, reply to another student's thread.

6.1 Reflect on your use of electronic devices.

In the first paragraph, reflect on your use of electronic devices (write in the first-person style).

  1. Do you feel that computing, such as video gaming and Googling, has changed how your brain works?
  2. What are the mental, emotional, and physical positive consequences of computing for you?
  3. What are the mental, emotional, and physical negative consequences of computing for you?

6.2 Research health issues related to computing.

In the second paragraph, write about a computer-related health issue.

  1. Check the SmartNews app to see if there are any current news articles about the consequences of long hours of gaming and computing.
  2. If not, search Google Scholar or the library for sources.
  3. Write about what you've learned from a single article (write in the third-person style). Cite the source by hyperlinking its title.

6.3 Post your finished writing.

  1. Click on the Chapter 6 ~ Do My Devices Help or Hinder Me? group discussion from the Home screen in Canvas.
  2. Click the more_vert 3-dot More menu to see the Rubric.
  3. Compare your work to the Rubric to ensure you've written about the required topics.
  4. Copy your writing from your discussion document and paste it into a new Reply thread and save.
  5. Reply to another student's thread with more detail about computing-related health issues (write in the third-person style). This is your third paragraph. Cite the articles you refer to by hyperlinking their titles.

The Consequences of Computing

6.4 Research and write about mental consequences.

  1. Open the What I’ve learned about computing document that you created in the previous chapter. Save the file with a new name so it reads What I've Learned First and Last Name Ch6.
  2. Click to read: Benefits of Play Revealed in Research on Video Gaming. Add the article to your bibliography tool.

    In the 6. Wellness section's first paragraph, summarize in the third-person style how video gaming may lead to improved cognition, creativity, and sociability. Right-click on the article's title above and choose Copy link address, then, select the name of the article in your paragraph and Ctrlk or k to add a hyperlink. Select important keywords and apply the Bold style.
  3. Login to the OSU Library's MyAccount area. Search for and read: The Internet Has Become the External Hard Drive for Our Memories. Add the article to your bibliography tool.

    In the second paragraph, summarize in the third-person style the concepts of off-loading and the transactive memory system. Right-click on the article's title above and choose Copy link address, then, select the name of the article in your paragraph and Ctrlk or k to add a hyperlink. Select important keywords and apply the Bold style.

6.5 Research and write about emotional consequences.

Assess one aspect of your online life...learn if you might be an online addict.

  1. Take this simple quiz to get a sense of questions to ask yourself: Are You Addicted to the Internet? Quiz.
    Then read: Internet Gaming Disorder vs. Internet Addiction Disorder. Add the articles to your bibliography tool.

    In the third paragraph, summarize in the first-person style your thoughts about the efficacy of the quiz, what you thought about the results, and whether you found it helpful for assessing your use of computers. In addition, summarize what you learned in the Disorder article. Right-click on each article's title above and choose Copy link address, then, select the name of the quiz in your paragraph and Ctrlk or k to add a hyperlink. Do the same for the second article. Select important keywords and apply the Bold style.
  2. Extra Credit: Add another paragraph that discusses The digital drug: Internet addiction spawns U.S. treatment programs
  3. Login to the OSU Library's MyAccount area.
    • The library resource is currently unavailable; use this version of The Online Disinhibition Effect instead.
    • Click this title to access the Library page about the article: The Online Disinhibition Effect. Once on that screen,
      • Add the article to your bibliography tool using the Cite link.
      • Copy the Permalink URL to make the hyperlink in the article title in your fourth paragraph.
      • Click the long EBSCO link.
      On Ebsco website, choose the picture_as_pdf PDF Full Text link. View the full article in the EBSCO viewer screen (loads slowly).
    In the fourth paragraph summarize in the third-person style the concept of disinhibition and all of its factors as it relates to the Internet. Select important key words and apply the Bold style.

6.6 Research and write about physical consequences.

  1. Click to read: From neck problems to hearing loss: How technology might affect your health. Add the article to your bibliography tool.

    In the fifth paragraph, summarize in the third-person style the seven major physical problems that can occur when using phones and laptop/desktop computers. Right-click on the article's title above and choose Copy link address, then, select the name of the article in your paragraph and Ctrlk or k to add a hyperlink. Select important keywords and apply the Bold style.
  2. Use the common left-hand and two-handed keystrokes to save your right arm from fatigue.
    Keystrokes to employ when typing.
    Experiment with the ones you haven't used yet. Most of them are available in most applications.
    • Open Ctrl or o.
    • Close Ctrl or w.
    • New Ctrl or n.
    • Quit Ctrl or q.
    • Save Ctrl or s.
    • Find Ctrl or f.
    • Find AgainCtrl or g.
    • Select All Ctrl or a.
    • Copy Ctrl or c.
    • Cut Ctrl or x.
    • Paste Ctrl or v.
    • Undo Ctrl or z.
    • Redo Ctrl or y.
    • Zoom In Ctrl or +.
    • Zoom Out Ctrl or -.
    • Stop Ctrl or . or Esc.
    • Pause spacebar.
    • Help Ctrl or ?.
    • Bold Ctrl or b.
    • Underline Ctrl or u.
    • Italic Ctrl or i.
    • Hyperlink Ctrl or k.
    • Endash OptionDash and Emdash OptionShiftDash.
    To help you remember the keystrokes, download and print this blank image of a keyboard and write them on the printout.
  3. When reading an online article to find a specific key phrase, do you endlessly scroll looking for it, or do you Ctrl or f to search for it? Try Ctrlf and search for the word 'eye strain' on this textbook page. The browser's Ctrlf search popup will tell you how many instances of the phrase it finds and it highlights each one so that you can very quickly jump to them by using the arrows or by hitting Enter or Return. You can also use the > and < keys to navigate through each instance until you find the one you want to read about.

    In the sixth paragraph, summarize in the first-person style your use of keyboard shortcuts/keystrokes that you learned recently and are using. Select the keystrokes or names of keystrokes and apply the Bold style.

6.7 Research and write about improving the quality of your life.

  1. Search for and view videos to learn how to relieve neck pain due to computing or search arm, hand, eye, or back stretches. Try a few recommendations. Add at least one movie to your bibliography tool.
  2. Based on what you read and tried in the previous 3 steps, write a seventh paragraph that summarizes in the first-person style how you can fix current technology-related health problems that you are experiencing. Right-click on the movie title you reviewed and choose Copy link address, then, select the name of the movie in your paragraph and Ctrlk or k to add a hyperlink. Select important keywords and apply the Bold style.
  3. Add all the bibliography entries (at least 7 sources) to the Bibliography section (last page) of your What I've Learned... document. Be sure to add author names, titles, publish dates, and publisher names if your tool did not provide them (for example, YouTube is not the author, title, or publisher of user-uploaded media). Select the list of entries and apply the Normal style as well as apply the format_list_numbered Numbered list icon.

6.8 Check grammar and spelling.

  1. Check and correct grammar and spelling using the built-in functions, Grammarly plugin, or LanguageTool Chrome extension.
    • Click the Review tab on the ribbon. Click Spelling or Spelling & Grammar.
    • Click Tools > Check Spelling > Spell check. A box will open in the top right corner.
    • ; or choose Edit > Spelling and Grammar > Check Grammar With Spelling (a checkmark indicates it’s on), then choose Check Document Now.

6.9 Make a PDF file.

  1. Save as the file with CtrlShifts or Shifts, and rename the file What I've Learned NAME Ch__. Replace NAME with your name. Replace __ with the chapter number. Next, create a PDF file:
    • From the File menu, choose Save As > PDF > Standard (for electronic and printing distribution).
      If you are using Word for Macintosh, then choose PDF > For Printing.
      Or, Ctrlp to Print a PDF file. Choose PDF from the list of printers.
    • From the File menu, choose Download as PDF.
    • From the File menu, choose Export to... and choose PDF.
      OR, p to Print a PDF file. Choose PDF from the list of printers.
  2. Check to confirm that hyperlinks work.
  3. Move all files to this course's folder in the Documents folder of your hard drive.

6.10 Submit the document.

  1. Click on the Canvas Home button and scroll down to the Assignment.
  2. Click the Assignment link.
  3. Upload the What I've Learned... PDF file.
  4. Confirm that it uploaded.
  5. Check the TurnItIn Report for plagiarized phrases and sentences. Review how to use TurnItIn.
  6. Either edit or quote the TurnItIn Report's highlighted passages in your original file and resave the PDF file.
  7. Upload the newer version in the Canvas Assignment.

You're not done! Continue onto the next step related to recording an assessment.

Record an audio or video assessment.

6.11 Choose an assessment of your computing lifestyle.

Businesses often need concepts, procedures, or sales and marketing materials explained in audio and/or video to improve understanding. The technical skills involved in making a media file and sharing it with others will help you explain yourself in a variety of situations... and it looks good on your résumé!

In this lesson, take what you wrote about in the previous steps and incorporate it into a 1-minute or less * video or audio recording.

Choose one of the following topics to address in either an audio or video recording. Write down what you plan to say and practice saying it before you record. Start with your first and last name. The quality of your voice is important (practice until it is loud and clear).

  1. Mental Conditioning
    Address answers to these questions:
    • What kind of electronic games do you play?
    • Do you feel they improve your cognition? How?
    • Do you feel they improve your creativity? How?
    • Do you feel they increase your motivation? How?
    • Do you feel they increase your social interactions? How?
  2. Emotional Intelligence
    Address answers to these questions:
    • What do you think about the results of the Addiction quiz?
    • Did you find the questions useful?
    • Did the survey reveal that you are a computer addict?
    • Have you ever engaged in any of these types of interactions:
      • dissociative anonymity, invisibility, asynchronicity, solipsistic introjection, dissociative imagination, and/or minimization of authority?
      and if so, did it help or hinder your success?
  3. Physical Improvements
    Address answers to these questions:
    • How do you sit while typing? On a hard or soft chair? Or do you stand?
    • Do you use two hands when typing or do you prop one elbow?
    • Do you use keystrokes?
    • What distance are your eyes from the screen?
    • Do you have the brightness of the screen set high or low? Is there any glare on your screen from lights or the sun?
    • What neck and arm stretches have you tried?

6.12 Record, edit, and optimize the media file.

  1. Using one of these four options, record your assessment:
    • Record using your phone's camera video function or an audio recording app.
      1. Launch your phone's camera and change the Settings to use the smallest resolution.
      2. Adjust the volume as needed even if you are speaking loudly and clearly.
      3. Click the Video button.
      4. Record your message and click the stop button.
      5. Trim and crop the movie with built-in tools to remove unecessary dead space and keep the recording at or below 1 minute.
      6. Try the Android Central tutorial if you need help.
      7. Compress the media to reduce the file size to 1240px using a service like: VideoSmaller.com.
      8. Share the file with your OSU Google drive.


      Or, record using the YouTube app on your phone.
      1. Launch the YouTube App.
      2. Click the Video icon.
      3. Click the Record button.
      4. Click the small red dot to begin recording.
      5. Click the large red dot to stop recording.
      6. Trim and crop the movie with built-in tools remove unecessary dead space and keep the recording at or below 1 minute.
      7. Click the Upload link and wait for the video to process.
      8. Click on the video in the list.
      9. Click the Share icon to copy the movie link.
      10. See more about using YouTube, below.
    • Record using your computer's webcam and the built-in tools. Your computer must have a webcam, microphone, and/or external camera installed. Adjust the volume as needed even if you are speaking loudly and clearly.

      For Windows:
      1. Launch the Voice Recorder or Camera app.
      2. Click microphone or video button to record.
      3. Click the stop icon to stop recording.
      4. Trim and crop the recording with built-in tools remove unecessary dead space and keep the recording at or below 1 minute.
      5. Right-click on the file name in the list (audio) to rename it.
      6. In Windows Search bar, locate the new file with Document: Recording (#).
      7. Upload it to your OSU YouTube.com account, which will stream it rather than download it. In the YouTube Studio area of your OSU Account, click the Video icon then choose Upload file. Try the Digital Trends tutorial if you need help.


      For Mac:
      1. Launch the QuickTime Player app.
      2. Choose File > New Video Recording.
        Quicktime Player's New Movie Recording feature.
      3. Click the Stop button when done recording.
      4. Trim and crop the recording with built-in tools remove unecessary dead space and keep the recording at or below 1 minute.
      5. Use the Upload button to open a connection to your OSU YouTube account's Studio upload area.

        Upload the saved recording to your OSU YouTube account.
    • Canvas Comments Media Comment. This built-in function will use your computer's webcam and/or microphone and save the file to Canvas Files.
      1. To locate the Media comment, click on this week's Assignment > Submission Details > Media Comment.

        Or, click on Grades > Assignment > Media Comment.
      2. Click Record Media.
        Record and attach media files in Canvas Assignment comments.
      3. Click the Webcam button to choose No Video if you only want to record audio.
        Turn off the webcam to record only audio.
      4. Click Start Recording when ready and click Stop when done.
      5. Trim and crop the recording with built-in tools remove unecessary dead space and keep the recording at or below 1 minute.
      The media file will automatically show up in the Commenting area of your assignment; no need to upload it.
  2. Save the file with your First and Last name.
  3. * One-minute movie file sizes are huge! Canvas only allows 100mb of file upload total, so your audio/video file size must be less than the remaining space you have on your account. Use YouTube if necessary (so you can submit a URL in Canvas instead of an attached file). Privacy settings on YouTube must be set to Public or Unlisted in order for the instructor to see the file.

    Do you have multiple channels associated your account? You may need to switch accounts to access the most appropriate channel. The Account menu is located on the right top corner of the screen, whereas the menus on the left are for all other YouTube actions.


    Click the blue Create or YouTube Studio button to navigate to the videos area.
    • Click the Upload Video button and locate your existing video.
    • Fill in the title, description, and other required fields.
    • Set the privacy setting to Unlisted.
  4. Play your recording to ensure that the audio volume is adequate and your voice is loud and clear.
  5. In the sharing screen, copy the URL of the video.

6.13 Submit the media file.

The previous submission required in step 6.10 must be completed before you record an audio or video file or submit a sharing URL in the Commenting box.

To see the Commenting Box with attachment options, click the Submission Details menu.
Submission details allows you to attach files in the Assignment screen in Canvas.

If you created your media file outside of Canvas, then use one of these methods to submit the file:

  1. Share the file from your OSU Google Drive by adding the sharing URL to the Canvas Assignment Comment box.
    • Right-click on the file get to the Sharing screen.
      Share the file with Anyone At OSU.
    • Click the Advanced link on the lower right corner.
      Share the file with Anyone At OSU.
    • Choose Anyone at OSU with the Link from the list of options. Click Done.
      Share the file with Anyone At OSU.
    • Copy the resulting link provided in the last screen.
      Share the file with Anyone At OSU.
  2. Share your YouTube URL in the Canvas Assignment Comment box. It will look something like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Abc123defg456

Back up to multiple sources

Earlier, you saved a copy of your work with a new name. Now, copy that backup to a different location, such as:

  1. Cloud drive such as Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or Apple iCloud.
  2. A USB stick drive.
  3. Zip archive file.
  4. Turn on automatic backups.
    • Windows 10
      Learn to use the Windows File History feature to backup files to a new location.
    • MacOS
      Learn to use Time Machine for backup up automatically to external hard drive devices.

Because bad things happen to good people and their computers, you must back up every time you work on a project. Losing your work because of a technical glitch and lack of a backup will not provide you with a due date extension; it will only provide you with empathy.

Criteria to meet by the end of chapter 6

If you have questions about how to use any of the required technologies for this lesson or what the following criteria mean, please reread the relevant lessons, view the Zoom recordings, then ask the Instructor via the Canvas Inbox.

Check Canvas Home, Assignments, and Calendar for the most current Due date and time. The Available Until date and time constitutes a grace period, which can be used in an emergency, or if you are ill.

By the end of chapter 6, these items must be completed to earn all full points:

Discussion

  1. Discussed mental, emotional, and physical positive and negative consequences of computing.
  2. Discussed and cited a current news or journal article related to mental, emotional, and/or physical consequences.
  3. Replied to another student's thread with more detailed research about how computing has or has not changed your brain.

Audio or Video

  1. Audio or video recording describes physical, emotional, or mental assessment.
  2. Audio or video recording has adequate volume and the voice is loud and clear.
  3. Audio or video recording was uploaded to Canvas via a sharing URL or media comment.

Writing

  1. First paragraph in section 6 describes the positive consequences of video gaming.
  2. Second paragraph in section 6 describes off-loading and the transactive memory system.
  3. Third paragraph in section 6 describes the computer addiction quiz.
  4. Extra Credit: In an additional paragraph, describe the USA's efforts to help people with computer addiction.
  5. Fourth paragraph in section 6 describes the types of online disinhibition.
  6. Fifth paragraph in section 6 describes the seven major physical consequences of computing.
  7. Sixth paragraph in section 6 describes your use of keystrokes.
  8. Seventh paragraph in section 6 describes your ideas for fixing technology-related health problems.
  9. Document is free of plagiarism.
  10. Document is free of spelling and grammatical errors.
  11. Bibliography lists all new sources (7 expected).
  12. Document was submitted as a PDF file.