Oregon State University

CS 101: Applications and Implications of Computers

Oregon State University, College of Engineering

Chapter 10 ~ How to Finance
Your Greatest Dream

Mom and child drive cross country in an RV in 2005. Now child drives her own car halfway across the country.
Instructor Pam Van Londen traveled full time in an RV for 9 months with her daughter. Read the 2004 financial analysis. (Daughter is grown now and that dream of driving her own car has come true!)

In this century, it is conceivable that we can do whatever we want with our lives: make a purchase, change a lifestyle, travel, or develop a new skill. Anything is possible if one has support, time, and money.

So begin to dream big! What do you want out of life? What fun do you want to engage in?

Dr. Lissa Rankin wrote in Psychology Today a list of 15 tips for dreaming big. The most important, in my opinion, is to ask yourself “What would you do if you took fear out of the equation?” She also reminds you to squelch your inner critic and try to visualize the dream. (Rankin 2010) Some dreamers create vision boards or surf the net looking for ideas. In this assignment, we'll visualize the dream in a spreadsheet.

No, you will not have to act on this dream for this class! Let's just pretend. In the process, you'll learn about yourself, what other people have done to achieve the same dream, and how you can meet financial goals.

You'll start by assessing your current monthly income and expenses, then move onto documenting a single dream.

⬆ Shiftrefresh Shift-Refresh this page to see the most up-to-date instructions.

Personal Finances

Print these instructions.

The following procedure has many steps, which are perhaps easier to follow when you print and check them off as you go. Hide/close + the previous section to avoid printing too many pages.

Need the Instructor's help?

If you have questions about completing the technical skills or the writing, you can share your file with the instructor.

  • Share a Google file:
    1. With your file open, click the Sharing button at the top right of the screen. Or, if the file is not open but listed in the Drive, right-click it to choose the Share menu.
    2. Click the Get Link box to update the OSU Settings and copy the link:
      Change settings so that only OSU people can view. Copy the link.
    3. Ignore the Share with People and Groups box for this course.
      Don't share your files this way for this course.
    4. Paste the URL into the Canvas Inbox message or Assignment Comment box, along with your questions. Note which step number you're stuck on.
  • Share a Microsoft file:
    1. Login to your OSU OneDrive account from the browser.
    2. Drag the file from your hard drive to the OSU OneDrive file list in the browser to transfer it there.
    3. Beside the file name in the list, click the Share icon:
      Click the Share icon for the file to change the settings.
    4. Choose the settings provided in the screenshot below:
      Change settings so that only OSU people can view it without editing or downloading.
    5. Copy the link so you can provide it to the instructor or in the Assignment Comment box.
      Click the Copy Link icon. Select and copy the link.
    6. Paste the URL into the Canvas Inbox message or Assignment Comment box, along with your questions. Note which step number you're stuck on.

10.1 Design an income and expenses worksheet

In this lesson, you'll design a simple spreadsheet to document average income and expenses for a typical month. This becomes your starting point. This is not a budget; it is a description of your current state of financial affairs. Use real amounts whenever possible but don't add account names or numbers. No one else will see your data but the Instructor and TAs. Do count expenses paid by family members as income...you'll see how below.

  1. Launch a spreadsheet application:
    • Microsoft Excel. Recommended for Business and Science-related majors. Brittani Palumbo demonstrates getting started with Excel. (2019)
    • Google Sheets. Recommended for inexperienced students who are not Business majors.
    • Apple Numbers. Not all of the required tasks are possible using this application. No technical support will be provided.
  2. Open a Blank worksheet file and save the filename as Personal Finances.
  3. Name the worksheet Income Expenses by double-clicking the untitled tab at the bottom.
    Double-click the sheet name to change it. Double-click the sheet name to change it.
  4. Type the following in Column A: Stretch the column to fit all the words in the row headings.
    Income 
    Job
    Family
    Financial Aid
    Savings
    Total Income
    
    Expenses
    Tuition
    Books
    Rent
    Water/Sewer
    Electric Power
    Phone service
    TV and Internet service  
    Groceries, dining, drinks
    Car loan
    Gas and oil changes
    Car insurance
    Entertainment
    Hair Cuts
    Pets
    Medical
    Savings account
    Other Loan
    Credit cards
    Total Expenses
    
    Total Discretionary
    
    Don't leave any of these row headings out. If you don't have those expenses, you'll give them a 0 zero amount later.
  5. Stretch column A to the right so that all of the longer row headings don't spill into the next column. Stretch row 7 Expenses down a bit so it creates space between it and the Total Income heading. Do the same for row 26 or 27 Total Discretionary.
  6. Click on the Row 1 selector on the left. Apply Bold using Cntlb or b. Do the same for these rows: Total Income, Expenses, Total Expenses and Total Discretionary. Bold the entire row, not just the heading.
  7. Label Column B with Monthly.
    Add a bold Monthly label to column B.
  8. Click on the Column A and B column selectors to select all rows in both columns. Then, click the align right button.
  9. Click on the Column B column selector and choose the $ financial dollar sign button to apply dollar signs to the numbers.
  10. While Column B is still selected, choose the .0 ← or .0 → icon to remove the decimal places. Even if you typed dollars and cents using a decimal, this button will remove the cents so you display only whole numbers.

10.2 Add and calculate income data.

For each item in Column A's Income section, add an actual amount in Column B.

  1. For the Job B2 cell, type the typical monthly income from jobs you hold. If you get paid weekly or bi-weekly instead of monthly, then click into the cell and use math to add two or more paycheck amounts together, like this: =400+200. The final number in the B2 cell will be 600. If you have, for example, a job where you earn minimum wage, you could calculate $10.25 per hour for 20 hours per week for 4 weeks using this math: =(10.25*20)*4.
  2. For the Family B3 cell, add a 0 zero if family doesn't provide help with any expenses. If they do help, then wait until you add those expense amounts later, before using a function to get the total.
  3. For the Financial Aid B4 cell, click in the cell to enter the monthly amount received for any given term. If you get a lump sum per term, then use math in that cell to divide the amount by 3 months, like this: =6540/3.
  4. For the Savings B5 cell, add the amount of monthly income from savings accounts.
  5. Select the number cells in column B, cells 2 through 5, then choose the Function SUM option to auto-fill the sum of numbers in the B6 Total Income cell. A typical formula looks like this: =sum(B2...B5), which means you want the total of numbers in column B rows 2 through 5.
    To input the sum of set of numbers, select a set of cells from the column or row then choose the Sum option from the Formula menu. A sum function with a column and row range.

10.3 Add and calculate expense data.

For each item in Column A's Expenses section, add an actual amount in Column B.

  1. For the Tuition and Fees B9 cell, type the amount of tuition for a single month.
  2. For the Books B10 cell, use math to calculate the term's book expenses divided by 3 months. For example, if you bought 4 books with these prices, add them up and divide by 3 to get a monthly average, like this: =(120+35+89+66)/3.
    Add expenses together and divide using math.
  3. For the Rent B11 cell, add your portion of monthly rent paid for your dorm, apartment, or house. If you live with family who pays your portion of the rent or mortgage, then ask them for the total mortgage expense and divided it by the number of people who live in the house. Use math in that cell to calculate it. For example, if two parents and a sibling live in the family home, then a mortgage of $1720 per month divided by 4 people is: =1720/4. Your portion of the rent is $430.
    Calculate your portion of the rent.
  4. For the Water and Sewer B12 cell, find the amount on your water bill if you live alone. Otherwise, use math to calculate your portion of the monthly amount.
  5. For the Electric power B13 cell, find the amount on your electric bill if you live alone. Otherwise, use math to calculate your portion of the monthly amount.
  6. For the Phone service B14 cell, find the amount on your landline and/or cellphone bill if you live alone. Otherwise, use math to calculate your portion of the monthly amount. Or, if you have a monthly rental and data amount, itemized on a family bill, use math to add those amounts.
  7. For the TV and Internet service B15 cell, find the amount on your landline and/or cellphone bill if you live alone. Otherwise, use math to calculate your portion of the monthly amount.
  8. For the Groceries, Dining, and Drinks B16 cell, use math to add up the total of receipts for a month's expenses for food, restaurants, and coffee, tea, and alcohol. If you don't save paper receipts, then look at the checking account or credit card register in your online bank account.
  9. For the Car payment B17 cell, enter the amount on your car payment bill (even if someone else pays it. This expense can get added to the Family income cell later. If you don't own a car, enter 0 zero.
  10. For the Gas and oil changes B18 cell, use math to enter the amount of receipts for a month's worth of gas. If you change the oil in your car every 3 months, then use math to divide that amount into 3 months. For example, if a full tank costs $32 and you fill it every week, and oil change costs $35 every 3 months, the math is =(32*4)+(35/3). If someone else pays these expenses, then add them anyway. This expense can get added to the Family income cell later. If you don't own a car, enter 0 zero.
  11. For the Car insurance B19 cell, enter the monthly amount or use math to calculate a monthly average if you pay it every 3, 6, or 12 months. If someone else pays these expenses, then add them anyway. This expense can get added to the Family income cell later. If you don't own a car, enter 0 zero.
  12. For the Entertainment B20 cell, use math to add up expenses for activities like cinema/movie/theatre, books, concerts, museums, club dues, cover charges, etc. Add only typical expenses for a single month.
  13. For the Haircuts B21 cell, enter the typical cost of a month's haircut. If you don't cut your hair, enter a 0 zero.
  14. For the Pets B22 cell, enter the typical cost of a month's pet expenses, such as food, vet bills, and accessories. If you don't have a pet, enter a 0 zero.
  15. For the Medical B23 cell, enter the typical cost of a month's medical expeneses such as medications, office visits, and equipment rental. If you don't have any medical expenses, enter a 0 zero.
  16. For the Savings Account B24 cell, enter the typical you add to a savings account. If you don't save, enter a 0 zero.
  17. For the Other Loans B25 cell, enter the typical amount of loan payment(s). If you have more than one, use math in the cell to add up the monthly payments. If you don't have other loans, enter a 0 zero.
  18. For the Credit Cards B26 cell, enter the typical amount of card payment(s). If you have more than one, use math in the cell to add up the monthly payments. If you don't have credit cards, enter a 0 zero.
  19. Select the number cells in column B, cells 9 through 26, then choose the Function SUM option to auto-fill the sum of numbers in the Total Expense B27 cell.
    Select the expense numbers and click the sum function to get an automatic total below.
  20. For any expenses that someone else paid, add them to the Family or other cells in the Income section. For example, if your parents paid your cellphone and car insurance bills, then click into the Family B3 cell and type =. Then, while that cell is still selected, click on the B14 cell, then type a +, then click into the B19 cell. Click Enter. Data from the two cells gets added to the B3 cell. This adds up the expenses paid by others, which becomes part of your income.
    Use math to sum other cell data together.
  21. Save the file with Ctrls or s.

10.4 Determine discretionary funds.

  1. Determine how much you have left over by clicking into the Discretionary Funds B27 cell and typing =B6-B26. This will subtract the Total Expenses from the Total Income.
  2. If your discretionary amount is positive, then you theoretically have some leftover money to save for dreams and emergencies.
    Positive discretionary can be saved or spent.
  3. If your discretionary amount is negative, then you spent more than you made. This could be because some of the monthly amounts are incorrect or missing.
    Negative discretionary may indicate a problem; you're spending more than you make.
    Make corrections to the amounts so that you end up with $0 or a small positive discretionary amount.

Doesn't your worksheet look great!

Example of a current finances spreadsheet
Add columns for each month of the year to see progress over time.

The results of your worksheet should look something like this.

Notice that all numbers are whole (no decimals) and align to the right. (Number columns are always aligned to the right in spreadsheets.) The row headings are aligned to the right as well to improve readability. Space is provided between Income totals and Expenses to make it easy to differentiate them. All total cells are bold, as are the column headers.

Earn Extra Credit

To earn 5 points of extra credit (and prepare for future financial planning), create a 1-year sheet:

  1. Add a column for each month of the year, starting in column C.
    Add a column for each of the twleve months.
  2. Add actual values to the current month's column (and any other months' columns that you know the amounts for). Don't however, add amounts to future months if you don't know those amounts yet, as you cannot predict the future. :-)
    Only add real values to the monthly cells.
  3. Use math in the cells as needed just like you did in step 10.3.
  4. When a monthly amount is exactly the same from month to month, drag its cell handle to the right to automatically fill in the amount for each month.
    Drag a cell to copy its contents.
  5. Use the =SUM() function in each of the 12 month columns to add up the total Income and Expenses.
    Use the sum function for each month's column totals.
  6. Use the =AVERAGE() function in column B to see an actual monthly average of all 12 months' incomes and expenses.
    Use the average function in column B.
    Use the average function in column B.
  7. Add the year to the sheet name so it reads 2020 Income Expenses.
    Rename the sheet to include the current year.
  8. Submit either a PDF file of the year-long sheet or paste the Sharing URL into the Assignment Commenting box.
    • If you submit a PDF file, choose landscape orientation and fit to width so all columns fit on one sheet.
    • If you submit a sharing URL, update the settings so that Anyone at OSU can view, so all TAs and the instructor can view it.

If, after the course is over, you continue to use this spreadsheet every month of every year to see what you're taking in and spending, then it'll be easier to plan for the future.

If you have large amounts left over each month, consider adding them to a savings account to help fulfill dreams and survive during emergencies.

Envision and Budget for the Dream

Now that you know how much money you have, you can plan ahead. Envision a single dream...a physical, tangible item or service and write about it. Then, you'll build a spreadsheet to correlate with that single dream.

10.5 Write about your dream.

  1. Open the What I’ve learned about computing document that you created in the previous chapter. Save the file with a new name so it reads What I've Learned First and Last Name Ch10.
  2. Navigate to the 10 How to Finance your greatest dream section.
  3. In the first paragraph state what the dream is. Focus on a single dream with a financial component to it, such as multiple expenses for physical items and tangible services. Please note that "debt-reduction" is not a good topic for this project. Select the name of your dream and apply the Bold style.
  4. In the second paragraph write about why you want to fulfill this dream.
  5. In the third paragraph write about how other people accomplished the same dream. Do the research...blog posts are a great place to start. Describe how they fulfilled their dream as it relates to how you might fulfill your dream. Select and copy the URL of the source, then, type and select the article title in your paragraph and Ctrlk or k to add a hyperlink.
  6. In the fourth paragraph write about obstacles to fulfilling the dream and how you might overcome them.
  7. In the fifth paragraph write about your level of comfort with tracking your finances. Do you use a Banking application to see how much money you have and/or spend? Does your family pay for some or all of your expenses and do they keep track of it for you? How do you keep track of your income from a job or Financial Aid? Do you use online tools? Paste the 2-column personal finances sheet after this paragraph. Retain the link between the pasted data and the original file.
  8. In the sixth paragraph write a description of three different spending scenarios for the dream you're budgeting for. Who would participate (you and a friend)? Where will it take place? When would it happen? How would you get there? What items are needed to complete the mission? What would you do before, during, and after to ensure success? (Note: Later you will paste in the Dream Budget sheet under this paragraph. Look ahead to see what that looks like.)

10.6 Design a dream budget worksheet.

  1. Open the existing Personal Finances file and click the + New Worksheet tab at the bottom.
  2. Double-click the worksheet name at the bottom to change it to Dream Budget.
    Double-click the sheet name to change it.
  3. Label Row 1 with: Expenses in Column A1, Scenario 1 in Column B1, Scenario 2 in Column C1, and Scenario 3 in Column D1.
    Sample budget for the dream. Taylor Moscoe demonstrates how to add and style the column headings. (2019) Captioned.
  4. Click on the Row 1 selector on the left. Apply Bold using Cntlb or b. Bold the entire row, not just the heading.
  5. Shiftclick on the column selectors for A through D. Then, click the align right button to align the numbers and labels to the right.
  6. Shiftclick on the column selectors for B through D and choose the $ financial dollar sign button to apply dollar signs to the numbers. For Excel users, click the Number formatting icon to change the Accounting $ numbers to Currency.
    In Excel, change the number formatting from Accounting to Currency.
  7. While Columns B through D are still selected, choose the .0 ← or .0 → icon to remove the decimal places.

10.7 Research the three scenarios for your dream budget.

Each dream is different and requires different combinations of expenses to help it be successful. Based on what you wrote about in paragraph 6, research costs for 10 or more physical items and/or tangible services. Beyond those categories of expenses, you'll provide three different scenarios for them... options for different times, seasons, brands, levels, etc. Keep reading to find out more and refer to the examples below.

  1. In Row 1, redefine the three scenario column headings to differentiate them for the single dream. Here are some ideas:
    • Renting an Apartment
      A set of scenarios for comparing apartment rentals.
    • Buying a Home
      A set of scenarios for comparing the purchase of a house.
    • Purchasing a Car
      A set of scenarios for comparing car costs.
    • Comparing Hotels
      A set of scenarios for comparing hotel stays.
    • Traveling to a City
      A set of scenarios for comparing travel to one city.
  2. In cells A2 through A 11 type the names of ten or more expenses that are needed to compare those three scenarios. Here are typical expenses for big-ticket items:
    • Renting an Apartment
      A set of expenses for renting an apartment or house.
    • Buying a Home
      A set of expenses for purchasing a home.
    • Purchasing a Car
      A set of expenses for purchasing a car.
    • Traveling
      A set of expenses for traveling.
  3. In Column B, C, and D's money cells 2 through 11, type in real amounts based on research of actual costs. For example, if you were going to travel from Portland to Mexico City, the American passport price might be $110 in two scenarios, but $140 if you also want to get the ID card. The Airfare prices from PDX in Portland to MEX in Mexico City might be $429 for an overnight Aeromexico flight, $519 for a non-stop Delta flight, and $1164 for a first-class United flight.
    One row with different prices for each scenario.
    Another example: A column of your sheet could represent 5-star hotel stays with room service meals and another could represent hostel stays with homemade meals.
  4. Ctrlc or c to copy the URL of the website where you found the prices. Right-click on the Expense cell and choose Link or Ctl or k and paste in the URL. This will allow you to jump right back to those price comparisons in the future.
    Right-click to make a hyperlink
    Right-click to make a hyperlink
    Google Sheets will not allow a hyperlinked number to remain a number when hyperlinked, so hyperlink the column A labels instead of the numbers. If you're using Excel, then numbers should have the Currency format applied rather than the Accounting format, so that the hyperlinks will work without interfering with future functions.
  5. Right-click on each scenario cell and choose Insert Note to describe the parameters of that price, such as August 6 Roundtrip Areomexico overnight nonstop flight PDX to MEX.
    Right-click to add notes.
  6. Research and type amounts for each expense and correlating scenario cell. Type notes and make hyperlinks for each so you can refer back to your original research.
  7. Use math in each cell where 2 or more amounts need to be added or otherwise calculated. Explain the amounts in the Notes for each. Add Links to row headings as needed to help you make future revisions.
    Use math to help calculate multiple expenses for each row.
  8. Under the last row of expenses, label the Column A cell with Total Expected Expenses.
  9. Select the number cells in column B, then choose the Function SUM option to auto-fill the sum of numbers in the Total Expected Expenses row. Do the same for Column C and D. OR Copy the B sum cell and paste it at the bottom of Column C and D...like magic, the function will change to fit the column it is in.
    To input the sum of set of numbers, select a set of cells from the column or row then choose the Sum option from the Formula menu. A sum function with a column and row range. All three columns have sums.
  10. Click on the Total Expected Expenses selector on the left. Apply Bold using Cntlb. Bold the entire row, not just the heading.
  11. Under the Total Expected Expenses row, add three new rows labeled with Monthly Savings for 1 year, Monthly Savings for 2 years, and Monthly Savings for 3 years.
  12. In the Column B For 1 year cell, use math to capture the Total... cell's value and divide it by 12 months, like this: =B12/12. Copy that function to the For 2 years and For 3 years cells in Columns C and D. Update the number of months in the math equation to 24 months and 36 months respectively.
    Use math to divide the number of months in each column.
  13. Save the file with Ctrls or s.

Doesn't your budget worksheet look great!

Example of a dream budget spreadsheet

The results of your worksheet should look something like this.

Notice that all numbers are whole (no decimals) and align to the right. (Number columns are always aligned to the right in spreadsheets.) The row headings are aligned to the right as well to improve readability. Space is provided between Total row and Savings rows to make it easy to differentiate them. All total headings and related data cells are bold, as are the column headers.

In addition, notice that the amounts make sense; they are based on actual options found through research and are hyperlinked for easy reference. The notes provide additional details (however, they will only paste in if using Google Sheets and not Excel).

Add the Sheets to the Document

Now that you know how much money you have, plan ahead. You'll build a spreadsheet to correlate with the dream you wrote about in paragraph 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6.

10.8 Add the Dream Budget sheet to your document and summarize.

So that you can display a visual representation of your financial data to correlate with the written explanation of your dream, add the new Dream Budget spreadsheet data to the document.

  1. In the spreadsheet file's Dream Budget worksheet, select all the columns and rows that have labels and data.
    Select all the active data cells.
  2. Copy the selected cells with Ctrlc or c.
  3. Navigate back to the document and place the cursor under the sixth paragraph you wrote in section 10 How to Finance your greatest dream about your dream scenarios, paste or insert the data:
    • Paste the selected cells with Ctrlv or from the Insert menu, locate the worksheet.
    • Paste the selected cells with Ctrlv or v.
  4. Fix problems that may have occurred when pasting, such as:
    • Left-aligned numbers must be changed to right-aligned numbers.
    • Skinny row headings that wrap must be stretched to show the entire label on one line (this improves readability of the numbers, too).
    • Don't worry about notes or comments that didn't paste and are not scored.
    • Hyperlinks should work just fine when pasted.
    • If the spreadsheet splits onto two pages, then place the cursor before the spreadsheet and add a page break:
      • CtrlEnter or Enter to force it onto a new page.
      • From the Layout tab, choose Breaks and Page (the first option).
        From the layout menu choose break page.
  5. Save the file with Ctrls or s.

10.9 Add the Personal Finances sheet to your document.

So that you can display a visual representation of your financial data to correlate with the written explanation of your financial situation, add the Income Expenses spreadsheet data to the document.

If you did the extra credit 1-year sheet, paste it in instead of the 2-column sheet.

  1. In the Income Expenses sheet, select all the columns and rows that have data.
    Select all the active data cells.
  2. Copy the selected cells with Ctrlc or c.
  3. Navigate back to the document and place the cursor under the fifth paragraph you wrote in section 10 How to Finance your greatest dream about your current finances, paste or insert the data:
    • Paste the selected cells with Ctrlv or v.
    • Paste the selected cells with Ctrlv or from the Insert menu, locate the worksheet.
  4. Fix problems that may have occurred when pasting, such as:
    • Left-aligned numbers must be changed to right-aligned numbers.
    • Skinny row headings that wrap must be stretched to show the entire label on one line (this improves readability of the numbers, too).
    • If the spreadsheet splits onto two pages, then place the cursor before the spreadsheet and add a page break:
      • CtrlEnter or Enter to force it onto a new page.
      • From the Layout tab, choose Breaks and Page (the first option).
        From the layout menu choose break page.
  5. Save the file with Ctrls or s.

Summarize your findings.

10.10 Compare Discretionary to Scenarios.

  1. Compare the monthly Discretionary amount in the Income Expenses worksheet with the Save for... amounts in the Dream Budget worksheet. Which scenario and savings plan fits your situation?
  2. In the seventh paragraph of the 10 How to Finance your greatest dream page, write a conclusion about how your finances are or are not adequate to fulfill the dream within 1 to 3 years.
  3. In the eighth paragraph, note where in your Income/Expenses you could make adjustments which would allow you to fulfill the dream. And note where in the Dream Budget you could adjust options to decrease the amount of savings needed.
  4. Optional: Add sources for your Dream research to the end of the Bibliography section (last page) of your What I've Learned... document. Select the list of entries and apply the Normal style as well as the format_list_numbered Numbered list icon.

    Optional: Sort the Bibliography list:
    • Select all entries in the Bibliography, then click the A/Z↓ sorting icon on the Home Tab. Reapply Normal style and Numbering if needed to clean up formatting.
    • Google Docs lacks a sort feature and OSU Google accounts does not always allow the installation of Add-Ons. You can, however, copy the list into a new doscument located in your personal Google Drive, then install the Paragraph Sort add-on. Once installed, you can select and sort the list, copy it, and paste it to your What I've Learned document on the OSU Google Drive. Select the list there, then reapply Normal style and Numbering to clean up the formatting.
  5. Refresh the Table of Contents by clicking the refresh button next to it (you may have to click on the list first). Remove the redundant headings if they are listed at the top.

    If you did not insert the automatic table of contents correctly as per chapter 2's instructions, then try it again now. Remove the old table of contents and place the cursor under the level 3 heading that says Table of Contents on the first page of your document.
      1. Triple-click the Table of Contents heading 3.
      2. From the References tab, choose Table of Contents > Automatic Table 2 (or something similar, like Classic).
        Choose Table of Contents from the References menu.
      3. Notice that headings from all of the pages are automatically added with page numbering. If they aren't then your page headings may not be set to Heading 3. Set all paragraphs to Normal style and all page headings (from page 2 on) to Heading 3.
      1. From the Insert menu, choose Table of Contents with numbering.
        Insert a numbered table of contents on the first page.
      2. Notice that headings from all of the pages are automatically added with page numbering. If they aren't then your page headings may not be set to Heading 3. Set all paragraphs to Normal style and all page headings (from page 2 on) to Heading 3.

    Select and delete the redundant items from the list so that the cover page with Table of Contents looks like this:
    Refresh the TOC and remove duplicate headings.
  6. Save as the file with CtrlShifts or Shifts, and rename the file What I've Learned NAME Ch__. Replace NAME with your name. Replace __ with the chapter number. Next, create a PDF file:
    • From the File menu, choose Save As > PDF > Standard (for electronic and printing distribution).
      If you are using Word for Macintosh, then choose PDF > For Printing.
      Or, Ctrlp to Print a PDF file. Choose PDF from the list of printers.
    • From the File menu, choose Download as PDF.
    • From the File menu, choose Export to... and choose PDF.
      OR, p to Print a PDF file. Choose PDF from the list of printers.
  7. Check to confirm that hyperlinks work.
  8. Move all files to this course's folder in the Documents folder of your hard drive.

10.11 Submit the assignment.

  1. Click on the Canvas Home button and scroll down to the Assignment.
  2. Click the Assignment link.
  3. Upload the What I've Learned... PDF file.
  4. Confirm that it uploaded.
  5. If you completed the extra credit option, then either upload or attach a PDF file of the year-long sheet or paste the Sharing URL into the Assignment Commenting box.
  6. Pat yourself on the back...you made it to the end! :-)

Back up to multiple sources

Earlier, you saved a copy of your work with a new name. Now, copy that backup to a different location, such as:

  1. Cloud drive such as Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or Apple iCloud.
  2. A USB stick drive.
  3. Zip archive file.
  4. Turn on automatic backups.
    • Windows 10
      Learn to use the Windows File History feature to backup files to a new location.
    • MacOS
      Learn to use Time Machine for backup up automatically to external hard drive devices.

Because bad things happen to good people and their computers, you must back up every time you work on a project. Losing your work because of a technical glitch and lack of a backup will not provide you with a due date extension; it will only provide you with empathy.

Criteria to meet by the end of chapter 10

If you have questions about how to use any of the required technologies for this lesson or what the following criteria mean, please reread the relevant lessons, view the Zoom recordings, then ask the Instructor via the Canvas Inbox.

Check Canvas Home, Assignments, and Calendar for the most current Due date and time. The Available Until date and time constitutes a grace period, which can be used in an emergency, or if you are ill.

By the end of chapter 10, these items must be completed to earn all full points:

Writing and Spreadsheets

  1. First paragraph of section 10 describes the dream to fulfill.
  2. Second paragraph of section 10 describes why you want to fulfill the dream.
  3. Third paragraph of section 10 describes at least one article that discusses how someone else fulfilled the same dream and the title of the article is hyperlinked.
  4. Fourth paragraph of section 10 describes obstacles to fulfilling the dream.
  5. Fifth paragraph of section 10 describes your current financial situation.
  6. Fifth paragraph of section 10 describes your level of comfort with tracking finances.
  7. Fifth paragraph of section 10 displays the Income Expenses worksheet either by pasting or inserting.
  8. Income Expenses worksheet includes all required rows and columns.
  9. Income Expenses worksheet includes reasonable data in each row/column.
  10. Income Expenses worksheet includes sum totals and discretionary totals.
  11. Extra Credit Income Expenses worksheet spans all 12 months of the current year and uses a monthly Average function.
  12. Sixth paragraph of section 10 describes three dream spending scenarios.
  13. Sixth paragraph of section 10 nicely displays the Dream Budget worksheet either by pasting or inserting.
  14. Dream Budget Scenario worksheet includes an adequate list of expected expenses for 3 scenarios.
  15. Dream Budget Scenario worksheet includes hyperlinks for 3 or more expected expenses.
  16. Seventh paragraph of section 10 summarizes the scenario and savings plan that might work to help fulfill the dream.
  17. Eighth paragraph of section 10 describes ways to adjust monthly expenses and budget expenses to improve chances of fulfilling the dream.
  18. Neither spreadsheet is split between two pages.
  19. Column/row headings are bold.
  20. All number columns are right-justified.
  21. Totals use dollar signs with whole numbers (no decimals).
  22. Worksheets use the sum function accurately.
  23. Document is free of plagiarism.
  24. Document is free of spelling and grammatical errors.
  25. Document was submitted as a PDF file.